RARE BIRDS ON VISIT IN THE FAROE ISLANDS and of course Nólsoy

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List of rare birds in Faroe Islands

Turtle Dove Streptopelia turtur

Turtildúgva / Streptopelia turtur
Turtildúgva / Streptopelia turtur Turtildúgva / Streptopelia turtur Turtildúgva / Streptopelia turtur
Turtildúgva / Streptopelia turtur Turtildúgva / Streptopelia turtur Turtildúgva / Streptopelia turtur
Common visitor
The Turtle Dove was ringed on Fair Isle 23rd May 2016 and the ring was read on the Faroe Islands on 30th June.

Read more


Hawfinch Coccothraustes coccothraustes
Coccothraustes coccothraustes

On June 4, 2016 Bogi Jacobsen found this dead Hawfinch in his garden, which was ringed in Poland. This is the first discovery of a Hawfinch in the Faroe Islands, and this is also the first discovery of a Polish ringed bird in Faroe Islands.

Read about the bird

The Ringing report


American Black Duck Anas rupribes

Anas rupribes
Anas rupribes Anas rupribes Anas rupribes Anas rupribes
Anas rupribes Anas rupribes Anas rupribes
Anas rupribes Anas rupribes Anas rupribes
The plantation in Tórshavn 08.05.2016

Oriental Turtle-Dove Streptopelia orientalis
Streptopelia orientalis

Streptopelia orientalis Streptopelia orientalis Streptopelia orientalis Streptopelia orientalis

Streptopelia orientalis Streptopelia orientalis Streptopelia orientalis

The plantation, Tórshavn 13.01.2016

Streptopelia orientalis Streptopelia orientalis

The plantation, Tórshavn 17.01.2016
Very rare, the second observation for Faroe Islands

Amur Falcon Falco amurensis

Falco amurensis Falco amurensis

Amur falcon seen for the first time in the Faroe Islands.
On 24. June 2015 Selma Mc Intosh took these two photographs of a female Amur falcon on her doorstep in Torshavn. Amur falcon breeds in southern Siberia to eastern China and Korea, and winters in several countries in South Africa. Amur falcon is very rare in Europe.
Selma sent the photographs to me, but I could not determine the species of this falcon. Therefore I passed on the photographs to Søren Sørensen, who determined the species.

Norwegian winter puffin Fratercula arctica arctica
Fratercula arctica arctica

There are three subspecies of puffins - or 3 sizes.
The smallest of them - Fratercula arctica grabae, is in the Faroe Islands. The medium one - Fratercula arctica arctica, which is much larger, is in northern Norway and Iceland. The third and biggest one, Fratercula arctica naumanni is in Greenland and Novaya Zemlya.
It happens regularly, that foreign winter puffins come to the Faroe Islands to forage. Then some of them are shot - it is allowed to shoot puffins in Faroe Islands in the winter. Until today 26 Norwegian ringed puffins are shot in the Faroe Islands in the winter.
On 27.01.2008 this Norwegian winter puffin on the image was found below some both houses on Nólsoy. It was so starved, that it could not stand on its feet, so it was put down just after that the picture was taken.
Note the large beak on the Norwegian puffin. Also notice the dark cheek and the lack of white stripe on its beak, which is the typical characteristics of a winter puffin.

Below you can see where the different subspecies breeds

Fratercula arctica
(Linnaeus, 1758) EU, NA : n Atlantic coasts
   F. a. arctica
(Linnaeus, 1758) e Canada and ne USA to Iceland, c and s Norway to s Novaya Zemlya  (nw Russia)
F. a. grabae (Brehm, CL, 1831) Faroe Is. to s Norway, British Isles and nw France
    F. a. naumanni Norton, AH, 1901 n Canada and Greenland to n Novaya Zemlya  (nw Russia)
Jens-Kjeld Jensen has written a book about puffin hunting in the Faroes. The book can be bought on our website. Read more about the book under Publications
 
Red Kite Milvus milvus
Red Kite (Milvus milvus)

Red Kite (Milvus milvus) Red Kite (Milvus milvus) Red Kite (Milvus milvus)

Red Kite (Milvus milvus)
John Reid Skoralíð found a Red Kite on the old road to Leirvík 24.03.2013. The whole bird was covered in oil. It had starved, so everything indicates, that it died from cold and hunger. This is the first registration of a Red Kite in the Faroe Islands.
Red Kite is between 61-72 cm. long and the oldest ringed was 25 years and 8 months.

Goldfinch Carduelis carduelis

Goldfinch / Carduelis carduelis
Dánjal Ári Poulsen

Goldfinch / Carduelis carduelis Goldfinch / Carduelis carduelis Goldfinch / Carduelis carduelis

17.04.2014 Dánjal Ári Poulsen found this rare died guest, who turned out to be a young female Goldfinch. Dánjal notices everything, so he will find what is worth finding on nólsoy.


Black swan Cygnus atratus Skála 20.04.2014
Black swan / Cygnus atratus
Black swan / Cygnus atratus
The black swan is drinking spring water where the river flows into the fjord

Black swan / Cygnus atratus

Black swan / Cygnus atratus Black swan / Cygnus atratus Black swan / Cygnus atratus

Black swan / Cygnus atratus Black swan / Cygnus atratus Black swan / Cygnus atratus

Black swan / Cygnus atratus Black swan / Cygnus atratus Black swan / Cygnus atratus Black swan / Cygnus atratus

Black swan Cygnus atratus

The Black swan comes from Australia and the ones that we see here, are either escaped captivity birds or chicks from these. In the UK there are about 25 pairs that breed wild in the nature, and in Denmark many fear, that they can outperform the White mute swan. It is especially within the last 10 years, that the Black swan has gone forward in Northern Europe. In Denmark the Black swan is considered as an invasive species in line with Lady's Mantle Alchemilla mollis and Iberian slug Arion lusitanicus.
Records of Black swan in the Faroe Islands:

In the late 1930s a Black swan was observed in a long period near Leitisvatn, Vágar.

In April 2002 a Black swan was seen in Vestmanna and presumably it was the same bird, that was seen later on Sandsvatn.

In 2006 Petur Nolsø, Tórshavn had a pair of Black swans, which got 4 chicks.

In May 2012 a Black swan was seen near Tórshavn and later it flew around on Sandoy.

This one from 2014 was first observed 12. February in Vágseiði in Suðuroy. Most probably it is the same bird, that has been located in Skálafjørður, Eysturoy the last 2 weeks. It can either have come from Great Britain or from Petur Nolsø.


The bramblings Fringilla montifringilla & European siskins Carduelis spinus are still here

Fringilla montifringilla & Carduelis spinus

Fringilla montifringilla Fringilla montifringilla Fringilla montifringilla Fringilla montifringilla

Tórshavn 06.05.2013

Brambling Fringilla montifringilla
Brambling / Fringilla montifringilla

Brambling / Fringilla montifringilla Brambling / Fringilla montifringilla Brambling / Fringilla montifringilla Brambling / Fringilla montifringilla

Tórshavn 30.04.2013


European Siskin Carduelis spinus

European Siskin / Carduelis spinus European Siskin / Carduelis spinus European Siskin / Carduelis spinus European Siskin / Carduelis spinus

Tórshavn 29.04.2013
European Siskin / Carduelis spinus
Tórshavn 02.05.2013

Sandwich Tern Sterna sandvicensis

Sandwich Tern / Sterna sandvicensis
The largest invasion of sandwich terns Sterna sandvicensis, ever observed in the Faroe Islands, was in April 2013.
The first time a sandwich tern was recorded in the Faroe Islands, was when this on the photo was sent to stuffing. It was found dead in Sørvágur, Vágar 29.03.1980. In 2008 there were three observations, but if it was 3 different sandwich terns or the same bird, that was seen 3 times, is not known.
First in April Hanna Joensen saw 3 sandwich terns near Sandur on Sandoy, they stayed there for several days. One was photographed 85 miles south of Akraberg on Suðuroy. Poul Johannes Simonsen saw one for several days in Hvannasund on Viðoy, besides several others were seen on the Northern Islands and around Skálafjørðurin. The last was seen by Hans Eli Sivertsen in Sandágerði on 20.04.2013. So at least 5 or 6 sandwich terns visited the Faroe Islands in April 2013.

White-tailed eagle Haliaeetus albicilla

White-tailed eagle / Haliaeetus albicilla White-tailed eagle / Haliaeetus albicilla

PJS photographed this young White-tailed eagle Haliaeetus albicilla 07th April 2013 between Borðoy and Viðoy. This is the 8 observation of white-tailed eagle since 1842, the last of which was registered in 1998.

Great white Egret Ardea alba
Great white Egret / Ardea alba
Great white Egret / Ardea alba

This stuffed Great white Egret was found dead in Søltuvík on Sandoy just before Christmas 2012


Ringed-billed Gull Larus delawarensis on visit
Larus delawarensis

Larus delawarensis Larus delawarensis

Larus delawarensis Larus delawarensis Larus delawarensis

Larus delawarensis Larus delawarensis Larus delawarensis Larus delawarensis

Larus delawarensis

Larus delawarensis Larus delawarensis Larus delawarensis

Jens-Kjeld Jensen & Larus delawarensis
10. March 2013 Jens-Kjeld caught, delaused and ringed a Ringed-billed Gull in Tórshavn whereafter he released it.

Waxwing Bombycilla garrulus

Waxwing / Bombycilla garrulus, Tórshavn 12.11.2012 Waxwing / Bombycilla garrulus, Tórshavn 12.11.2012
Waxwing / Bombycilla garrulus 2012

Invasion of waxwings: The first Waxwings arrived in Sandavági 22.10.12. The next 3 weeks many were seen across the country, but only few are seen the later days.


Atlantic Yellow-nosed Albatross Thalassarche chlororhynchos

Atlantic Yellow-nosed Albatross / Thalassarche chlororhynchos Atlantic Yellow-nosed Albatross / Thalassarche chlororhynchos

Read the article


Bonaparte’s Gull Chroicocephalus philadelphia (Larus philadelphia)

Bonaparte’s Gull / Chroicocephalus philadelphia Bonaparte’s Gull / Chroicocephalus philadelphia

Bonaparte’s Gull is only observed once in Faroe Islands, this was photographed in January 2012

Iceland Gull Larus glaucoides is starving to death

Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides

Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides

Iceland Gull Larus glaucoides breeds in Greenland and a little further west Larus glaucoides kumlieni - which is a subspecies of Iceland Gull - breeds.
Here in early January 2012, Icelandic Gulls are all over the Faroe Islands. We have not had such a large invasion of Iceland Gulls since January/February 1983. The Iceland Gulls are everywhere and I have talked to fishermen, who say there are 30-40 birds around the boat all the time.
Since it is normal to eat for example Iceland Gull and Glaucous Gull Larus hyperboreus in the Faroes, I have had the opportunity to examine some of these Iceland Gulls a little closer. Except from one they were all very skinny - in fact they were on the verge of dying of hunger.
Iceland Gull is seen commonly in the Faroe Islands in winter, and studies have shown that normally 96% of the birds are females but the gender distribution of this invasion is 80% males and 20% females, and such a gender, I have never before seen here. One can imagine that since females are smaller, they do not perform well in the competition for food and therefore they will move away in an attempt to find areas where competition is not so high. When males are now emerging on the Faroe Islands in large numbers, it suggests that there is an extreme shortage of food in Greenland. They simply have fled from Greenland because of food shortages, but the question is whether there are able to get any rescue here in the Faroes, where the birds have starved for the last many years.
Unlike the invasion in 1983, very few of theese Iceland Gulls look like the western stock - Baffin Gull Larus glaucoides kumlieni from Baffin Island, but they will perhaps also show up a little later. Baffin's Gull Larus glaucoides kumlieni vary widely and there are many intermediate forms, but in general the juveniles are darker as well as the older birds have dark drawings on the primaries.

Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides

Update 09.01.2012

Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides

On 08.01.2012 this Iceland Gull was sitting on the pier in Nólsoy to weakened to fly. It only had enough energy to stand up for a moment before it had to lie down again. It is a male and weighs 575 g. Normal weight for such a big male should be around 300 g. more.

Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides
Notice the head lice of the genus Saemundssonia (Saemundssonia) lari (O. Fabricius, 1780)
Update 11.01.2012

Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides Iceland Gull / Larus glaucoides

11. January 2012 38 Iceland Gulls were fishing plant plankton in Hálgutoft right south of Klivar, which is the harbor in Nólsoy. One large male was found dead on the quay, his weight was 489 g. No one has ever before seen so many Iceland Gulls at once in Nólsoy.

Kumlien's Gull Larus glaucoides kumlieni

Kumlien's Gull / Larus glaucoides kumlieni Kumlien's Gull / Larus glaucoides kumlieni Kumlien's Gull / Larus glaucoides kumlieni

This old male was in Nólsoy 12.01.2012

Black Redstart Phoenicurus ochruros

Black Redstart / Phoenicurus ochruros Black Redstart / Phoenicurus ochruros Black Redstart / Phoenicurus ochruros

This is the tenth Black Redstart for the Faroe Islands and the first, that has ever been ringed here.

Scarlet Rosefinch Carpodacus erythrinus
Scarlet Rosefinch / Carpodacus erythrinus

Scarlet Rosefinch / Carpodacus erythrinus Scarlet Rosefinch / Carpodacus erythrinus Scarlet Rosefinch / Carpodacus erythrinus

29.08.2011 I ringed 3 young Scarlet Rosefinches on Nólsoy. They were caught in the Heligoland trap.

Cape Shelduck Tadorna cana
Tadorna cana Tadorna cana Tadorna cana

This Cape Shelduck visited Tórshavn 12. May 2011. Cape Shelduck comes from South Africa, so this must be a duck, who has escaped from captivity in one of our neighbour countries.


The first Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus overwintering in the Faroe Islands in 2010/2011

Blue Tit / Cyanistes caeruleus Blue Tit / Cyanistes caeruleus Blue Tit / Cyanistes caeruleus

The first Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus for Faroe Islands was registered 06.12.2010. I assume, the Blue Tit came along with the Great Tits in October. This is of course also the first Blue Tit, who has stayed in the the Faroe Islands during a whole winter.

The first Great Tits Parus major overwintering in the Faroe Islands in 2010/2011

Great Tit / Parus major Great Tit / Parus major Great Tit / Parus major

For the first time ever 4 Great Tits have stayed all the winter in the Faroe Islands. I succeeded to ring one of them.


Great Tit Parus major
Great Tit / Parus major Great Tit / Parus major Great Tit / Parus major

Great Tit / Parus major Great Tit / Parus major Great Tit / Parus major Great Tit / Parus major

Several Great Tits are observed in the Faroe Islands in October 2010 and the one on these photographs is one of them.

Great Tit / Parus major Great Tit / Parus major

Great Tit is only observed once before in the Faroe Islands, namely when 2 were caught in the Helgoland trap on Nólsoy 02. May 2003. Later we found, that these 2 had come by a ship and that the one of them was ringed near Holbæk in Denmark.

Pallas' Rosefinch Carpodacus roseus

Carpodacus roseus Carpodacus roseus

I caught this Pallas' Rosefinch on Nólsoy 28.04.2003. It has most probably escaped from a cage and then flown to Faroe Islands. This is the only registration of Pallas' Rosefinch in the Faroe Islands.


Osprey Pandion haliaetus
Osprey / Pandion haliaetus
Osprey / Pandion haliaetus

12.09.2010 the ship Viking Lady approached Runavík with this Osprey on board. The bird was a chick from this summer. Hans Eli Sivertsen took care of the bird for approximately 14 days, mainly feeding it with mackerel.

25.09.2010 Jens-Kjeld Jensen ringed the Osprey, where after it was released.

Osprey / Pandion haliaetus

Osprey / Pandion haliaetus Osprey / Pandion haliaetus Osprey / Pandion haliaetus

Osprey / Pandion haliaetus Osprey / Pandion haliaetus Osprey / Pandion haliaetus


Eider Somateria mollissima faeroeensis
Eider / Somateria mollissima faeroeensis
Eider / Somateria mollissima faeroeensis Every year foreign Eiders visit Faroe Islands. The foreign Eiders differs in size, colour and especially head profil as you can see on the photo. The Faroese Eiders are local birds and do not migrate. They belong to the subspecies Somateria mollissima faeroeensis and the population is around 7000 pairs. Eider / Somateria mollissima faeroeensis

Little Bunting Emberiza pusilla

Emberiza pusilla Emberiza pusilla Emberiza pusilla

The first record for Little Bunting was made in the Faroe Islands in March 2010, when this male was sent to me to get stuffed. I will make some further inquires about this bird, since this is the first registrated Little Bunting ever in the Faroe Islands.
Update: I was told, that the Little Bunting landed on a fishing vessel approximately 10 miles East of Fuglø late in the summer 2006. It was completely exhausted.

Jackdaw Corvus monedula
Jackdaw / Corvus monedula
Jackdaw / Corvus monedula Jackdaw / Corvus monedula Jackdaw / Corvus monedula Jackdaw / Corvus monedula
Jackdaw is a rare guest in the Faroe Islands. According to Eiler Einarsson 9 Jackdaws were observed in Rituvík 07.11.2009 and the day after – 08.11.2009 - 2 Jackdaws were observed in Nólsoy. Since then 11 Jackdaws have been situated in Tórshavn, so it is not unlikely, that they will stay in the Faroes. After all they have already stayed for almost 5 months.
22.03.2010 I saw 6 Jackdaws near the shopping centre SMS in Tórshavn where I managed to shoot these photographs of them.
Update: 31.05.2010 I saw no Jackdaws, they have all returned home.
Jackdaw / Corvus monedula Jackdaw / Corvus monedula Jackdaw / Corvus monedula Jackdaw / Corvus monedula

Turnstone Arenaria interpres

Arenaria interpres Arenaria interpres

Turnstone seems to spend the winter in the same place year after year. This old male was ringed by Guy Morrison in Alert on Ellesmere Island in North Canada (82.30N - 62.20W) 1. June 2008. Hans Eli Sivertsen observed the turnstone 28. March 2009 near Bacalao in Tórshavn, and he observed it again this winter in the same place. Jens-Kjeld took these photographs of the turnstone 1. February 2010.

Arenaria interpres Arenaria interpres Arenaria interpres Arenaria interpres

Two-Barred Crossbill Loxia leucoptera
Two-Barred Crossbill / Loxia leucoptera
Two-Barred Crossbill is a very rare visitor in the Faroe Islands. It is only registered 7 times since 11. August 1898. Number 8, which is this young male that I have stuffed, was found dead in Suðuroy in the summer of 2008.

Ortolan Bunting Embrezia hortulana
Esbern í Eyðansstovu took this photograph in Mykines 24. October 2009. The bird was there the day after as well.
Ortolan Bunting / Embrezia hortulana
Ortolan Bunting is found in Faroe Islands earlier: In 1926 a male was found in Nólsoy
3. - 5. November 1945 another male was observed in Nólsoy
2. May 1947 a third male was observed in Nólsoy

Red-Flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus
Red-Flanked Bluetail / Tarsiger cyanurus

This Red-Flanked Bluetail was caught in the Heligoland-trap on Nólsoy 06.10.2009. This specie is the first recovery for Faroe Islands and it is likely, that this rare guest comes from Russia.

Red-Flanked Bluetail / Tarsiger cyanurus

Crossbill Loxia curvirostra
28. June 2009 Turið Vestergaard observed 6-8 Crossbills in Trangisvági, Suðuroy, and since then observations have come in from all over Faroe Islands

The Crossbills come from Scandinavis, mainly because of lack of spruce cone seed in their homeland. They then migrate, hoping to find plenty of spruce cone seed in for example Faroe Islands.

Until now several Crossbills are found dead. The photographed yellow female was caught by a cat in Nólsoy today 02. July 2009. Today Agneta Jacobsen simultaneously caught 3 Crossbills in the kindergarden in Nólsoy, whereof the red photographed male above is one of them.


Snowy owl Bubo scandiaca (Nyctea scandiaca)

Símun Petersen was lucky to get theese photographs of a Snowy owl 27. April 2009 in "Gilinum á Høgaryggi", situated between Múlahaga and Krossdal on Borðoy. This is the 4 registrated observation of Snowy owl in the Faroe Islands since 1955. The 3 other observations are:
October 1990, Hvannasund, Viðoy: 1 female found dead by Oskar Simonsen and Poul Johannes Simonsen.
30. July 2001: 1 seen north of Saksun, Streymoy by Kirstin Blom, Bette Johansen and others. Documented by photograph.
11. September 2004:  Trongisvágur, Suðuroy: 1 adult male seen by Jens Petur Brattalíð. Photograph: Bjarni Nygaard.
On the other hand there are several none registrated observations of Snowy owl: A man name Torvald shot 1 in Porkeri, Suðuroy in about 1955. Around 1969 1 was seen near Sumba, Suðuroy. 1 male was shot in Nólsoy in about 1970 (it was stuffed). Many people saw 1 fly over the harbour in Nólsoy, when the ferry Ritan arrived in about 1978. 1 was almost run over by a car, as it was sitting in the middle of the road between Tjørnuvík and Langasandur a winter night in about 1975 and finally 1 was seen 27. November 2004 in Kirkjubønes, Streymoy by people, that were hunting hares.

There is no real system in the visits of Snowy owl in the Faroe Islands and it has never been registrated systematically.
Salomonsen (1963) writes about 15 findings/observations, and he also mentions an invasion in 1955.
Governor Müller (1863) writes about 1 from about 1843 and another 1, that stayed the whole winter in 1849-50. 1 was caught in 1855 and finally he writes, that he has heard about many seen around the islands that year.
Is it possible, that Salomonsen has gone 100 years wrong, when he perhaps thought about the invasion in 1855, and then wrote 1955 instead?
In October 1857 2 Snowy owls were seen near Tórshavn and 1 was seen on the same spot 25. May 1861.
Andersen (1901) writes, that Müller shot 1 adult male near Tórshavn 14. September 1863.
Andersen (1897) writes after Petur á Botni: Nyctea nivea: Seen several times and once shot in Nólsoy.
Salomonsen (1935): 1 female in Nordredal, Streymoy 18. June 1897 and 1 Mykines 10. February 1900.


Subalpine Warbler Sylvia cantillans

This Subalpine warbler female was ringed in Nólsoy 21. May 2009. This is the second recovery of this bird in the Faroe Islands. The first male was spotted and photographed by Hans Eli Sivertsen in the village of Mykines Friday 15. May 2009.

Since 08. May 2009 five new bird species are observed in the Faroe Islands: Aythya affinis, Hirundo daurica, Milvus migrans, Milvus milvus og Sylvia cantillans. They are not approved by the Danish Rarity Commitee SU yet.

Cattle Egret Ardeola ibis
Ardeola ibis.

The first Cattle Egret visiting Faroes was observed 28. September 2008 in Dalinum, Viðoy. The lucky observer was Tummas Thomasen. He told Olevinus Sørensen, Viðareiði about the Egret, and the day after - around noon, he observed the bird at the same location. In the evening the Egret flew to Viðareiði, where it was seen by Tóri Simonsen and others. 30. September Tóri Simonsen took these two photographs among others.

Ardeola ibis.
Jens-Kjeld sent the information to FaroeNature, and since then, several have been on the location to see the rare guest.

Continental Comorant Phalacrocorax carbo simensis

25. March Karl Thomsen spotted this Continental Comorant on the location Drotningarsteinur, Skálafjørður, Eysturoy. 29. March Hans Eli Sivertsen shot this excellent photograph of the bird. This is the first observation of Continental Comorant in Faroe Islands.

Phalacrocorax carbo simensis

Merlin Falco columbarius on visit Sep. 2007

Falco columbarius

The Faroese and Icelandic Merlin belong to the subspecie F. c. subaesalon. They are bigger are darker then the other Merlins.

Falco columbarius

Faroe Islands host 25 breeding pairs of Merlins, but we have regular visits from the Icelandis stock, when they migrate in the spring and autumn.
Young female   Young female

View the list of rare birds seen in the Faroe Islands in 2005 and 2006

List of rare birds seen in Faroe Islands until May 2003

Rare duck seen in Sandágerði, Tórshavn
Klik på billedet for fuld størrelse. 11. May 2005 Hans Eli Sivertsen observed a female Ferruginous Duck in Sandágerði, Tórshavn. Now we are in the end of May, it is still here. This is the first observation of Ferruginous Duck in the Faroe Islands. Klik på billedet for fuld størrelse.

Little Gull Larus minutes seen again on Nólsoy
This Little Gull was photographed on Nólsoy 24. May, while he was flying around with the Kittiwakes. This is the 11'th Little Gull observed in the Faroes Klik på billedet for fuld størrelse. Dværgmåge Larus minutes besøger Nólsoy igen
The Little Gull was spotted in Nólsoy 10. April 2004, while he was flying around together with other common gulls. Little Gull is only observed 9 times before in Faroe Islands. Dværgmåge Larus minutes på besøg

Rare ringed-bill gull seen in Sandágerði, Tórshavn and in Vágar
Late in March 2005 Hans Eli Sivertsen observed a 2y Ring-billed Gull in Sandágerði, Tórshavn. The Gull has been observed regularly since then.
In May 2005 similarly at least two 2y Ring-billed Gulls has been observed in Miðvági. One of them has stayed the whole summer in Vatnsoyrum. Ring-billed Gull is only observed two times earlier in the Faroe Islands, and in both cases it was 2y birds.

Sjælden ringnæbbet måge set i Sandágerði, Tórshavn og på Vágar

More pictures here


Rough-legged Hawk in the Faroes
Amerikansk Låddenbenet musvåge
Read the article
Read the PDF article from Birding World
Read the PDF article from Birding World: Are dark morph Rough-legged Hawks overlooked in Europe?

This Little Bittern Ixobrychus minutus, also found the way to the Faroe Islands.. Dværghejre Ixobrychus minutus
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